Act 5
Scene 1: Mantua. A street.

Enter Romeo.

Romeo.
If I can trust what happens when I sleep,
My dreams show something joyful will come.
Love rules my heart,
And I have many cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady found me dead
(Strange dream that gives a dead man to think again!)
And I breathed life with the kisses from my lips
How sweet is love when it is thriving.
[Enter Romeo’s servent Balthasar.]
Ah Balthasar, how are you?
Do you have my letters from the friar?
How is my lady? Is my father well?
How is Juliet? For nothing can be wrong if she’s cool.

Balthasar.
Then she’s well, and nothing is wrong.
She rest in Capulet’s tomb
And her soul lives with the angels.
I saw her laying dead
And I came here to tell you.
O, pardon me for having to bring the bad news.

Romeo.
Is that so? You’re crazy!
Get me a pen and some paper
And get the car, I will leave tonight.

Balthasar.
Romeo, please, have patience.
You’re getting too ahead of yourself

Romeo.
Don’t worry about it, you’re wrong.
Be quiet and do as I say
Do you have the letters from the friar?

Balthasar.
No sir.

Romeo.
Okay, get going.
And get me the car. I’ll be with you right away.
[Exit Balthasar.]
I hope to be wit Juliet tonight.
Let’s figure this out.
I do remember a drug dealer.
And he sells from a dark alley.
Quite a thin man he is, being poor.
Although the result of selling poison is death,
This dealer will surely give me some for the money I offer.
Just pass this corner and… Ah!
Why hello! *name?*!

[Enter Drug Dealer]

Pharmacist.
Who is it?!

Romeo.
Come here, I want some poison,
But not just any old poison,
One that will drop a man instantaneously.

Pharmacist.
I have what you want but it would cost me my life.

Romeo.
You’re a ragid old man with the need for money.
Take my money and use it to buy food,
Water and a new shelter.
Don’t listen to the law and give me the poison.

Pharmacist.
I need the money but I can’t do it.

Romeo.
Here’s the money, no one else has to know.

Pharmacist.
Alright.
Put this in any drink you wish,
And your life will be taken right from you.

Romeo.
Count it out.
That wasn’t so bad was it?
Goodbye. Go buy food and put on some weight.
I will use this poison out of love, thank you.
[Exeunt.]
Act 5
Scene 2: Friar Laurence’s cell.

Enter Friar John.

John.
Holy friar, hello!

[Enter Friar Laurence.]

Friar Laurence.
Hello Friar John.
Welcome from Mantua. What did Romeo say?
Give me his response.

John.
I was helping an old friend in the city,
This delayed my speed and I was unable to stop at the post office,
Therefore, the post office did not give Romeo the letter

Friar Laurence.
Then who did?

John.
No one, I could not send it off,
Here it is again.

Friar Laurence.
Oh shoot!
This letter was not a social one, but one of great importance,
If Romeo doesn’t have it, this could get complicated.
Friar John, go and get me an iron crowbar and bring it here- immediately.

John.
Right away sir.

Friar Laurence.
Within the next three hours, Juliet will wake.
She will be devastated that Romeo has not heard of these events.
But I will write to Romeo again
And keep her at my cell until Romeo comes-
Poor Romeo, seeking out Juliet’s dead body.

[Exit.]

Act 5.
Scene 3: A Churchyard with a monument belonging to the Capulet’s.

Enter Paris and Page with flowers and scented water.

Paris.
Give me the torch, and go stand over there.
Put out the torch so I can’t be seen.
Hide under the trees,
Listen to see if anyone is coming,
And if you hear someone, signal me.
Give me those flowers and watch for people.

Page.
I’m kind of afraid to stand alone,
But I got you.

Paris.
I will spread flowers over your grave,
Or if you don’t want that,
I will weep next to your grave.

[Page whistles.]

Someone’s coming,
But who could be here at this time of night,
Interrupting my actions of remorse?
Someone with a torch, I must hide now!

[Retires]

[Enter Romeo and Balthasar with a torch, a pickax and an iron crowbar.]

Romeo.
Give me the pickax and the crowbar.
Here, take this letter and take it to my dad tomorrow.
I need some light.
Swear that what you hear and see you wont speak of.
I need a ring from my wife’s dead finger.
Therefore, you must leave.
And if you come back, I will break you,
This plan is wild and crazy but you’ve been warned.




Balthasar.
I’ll go, and not bother you.

Romeo.
If you’re a good friend you will stick true to your word.
Leave now, bye.

Balthasar.
Same to you, but I choose to stay nearby because I doubt your intentions.

Romeo.
You horrible person!
You should have more respect for a man like me!

[Romeo opens the tomb.]

Paris.
It’s that arrogant Montague who left.
He’s the one who murdered my love’s cousin Tybalt.
I’ll get him back,
Stop this you jerk!
What revenge do you plan to commit upon those dead bodies?
Come her fool; You must die.

Romeo.
I must indeed. That’s why I came here.
Go away and leave me alone;
Please, bro, don’t get me pissed.
I don’t want to have to kill you!
Leave now, and tell everyone a madman told you to run away.

Paris.
No, I wont do it!
I will arrest you right now!

Romeo.
You wanna go?
Alright, lets fight boy!

[The fight.]

Page.
Oh no, they’re fighting,
I have to call someone for help!

[Exits. Paris falls.]
Paris.
Oh, I’m dying. Please open the tomb,
And lay me next to my beloved Juliet.

[Paris dies.]

Romeo.
Alright, I will.
Paris was not supposed to marry Juliet,
Oh, give me your hand. Both of us have had bad luck!
I’ll bury you in a magnificent grave.

[Open grave and reveals Juliet.]

A grave? Oh no! Juliet lies here,
And she still looks beautiful yet she doesn’t deserve this rotten tomb,
Paris will lay here.

[He lays Paris in the tomb.]

How often are men happy before their death?!
I stand before you as happy as can be and
You look beautiful even as you possess death.
Death has just taken your life for you are not pale yet.
Forgive me, for killing a man
How do you still look so beautiful Juliet?
Everything including death loves you!
I don’t like this idea so I will never leave your tomb,
Here I’ll remain with you forever.
Seal with a righteous kiss for I cannot live without you.

[Romeo kisses Juliet and takes out the poison.]

Here you are bitter and deathly liquid,
Here’s to my love!

[Romeo drinks the poison.]

O that druggist was right for this poison is quick,
So I die with a kiss.

[Falls.]

[Enter Friar Laurence with a lantern, a crowbar and a shovel.]




Friar Laurence.
Oh help me God!
Who’s there?

Balthasar.
I’m a friend of yours, don’t worry.

Friar Laurence.
God bless you! Now,
What is that light over there?
The one that you can barely see;
It looks like something coming from Capulet’s tomb.

Balthasar.
Ya, it’s coming from there.
My best friend’s is there. The one you love.

Friar Laurence.
Who is it?

John.
Romeo.

Friar Laurence.
How long has he been there?

John.
About a half an hour.

Friar Laurence.
Come to the tomb with me.

John.
I wouldn’t dare sir. He doesn’t know I am still here,
And if I leave, I will be playing with death.

Friar Laurence.
Fine then, I’ll go alone. I am scared though,
For I seek ominous threats.

John.
While I was napping under that tree,
I dreamt that my master and someone fought,
And that my master killed him.




Friar Laurence.
[Approaching the tomb.]

Romeo! Oh no, what the crap happened here?

[Enters the tomb.]

Romeo! Dead?! And Paris?! Both covered in blood,
Ah, when could these horrible things have happened?!
Juliet!

[Juliet awakes.]

Juliet.
Oh Friar! Where is my man?
I remember where I should be,
But where is my Romeo?

Friar Laurence.
I hear some noise. Juliet, get out.
The plan has been ruined! Your husband lies dead here,
Along with Paris. I’ll take you somewhere away from all this havoc.
The watch is coming. Come, let’s go Juliet!

Juliet.
Go? Leave? I’m not going anywhere!

[Friar Laurence exits.]

What’s this cup laying in my true loves hand?
Poison! Oh no, Romeo’s dead and there’s no poison left for me.
I will kiss his lips in hope of me dying with my love.

[Kisses him.]

His lips are warm!

Chief Watchman.
Boy, which way?! (to Page.)

Juliet.
What was that? Then I must be brief,
A dagger!

[Grabs Romeo’s dagger.]

Flow through my body and let me die!
[She stabs herself and falls.]

[Enter Paris and Watchman.]

Boy.
This is the place; where the torch is burning.

Chief Watchman.
The ground is bloody. Search the graveyard!
Go, and arrest whomever you find!

[Some Watchmen exit.]

This is a terrible! Paris is dead; Juliet has been bleeding only a short time,
Even though she has been buried for two days.
Go, tell the Prince.
Run to the Capulets! Run to the Montagues!
Have some others search.

[Some of the watchmen enter with Romeo’s man, Balthasar.]

Second Watchman.
Here’s Romeo’s man, we found him in the churchyard.

Chief Watchman.
Hold him in safety until the Prince arrives.

[Enter Friar Laurence and another watchman.]

Third Watchman.
Here is a friar who’s crying and weeping.
We took his pickax and shovel from him,
As he was walking from this side of the graveyard.

Chief Watchman.
Very suspicious; Hold the friar too.

[Enter the Prince and Attendants.]

Prince.
What just happened,
That forced me to get out of bed?

[Enter Capulet and his wife, Lady Capulet, with others.]

Capulet.
What is everyone screaming about?

Lady Capulet.
People in the street are screaming “Romeo”,
Others are screaming “Juliet,” and some are screaming “Paris”.
They’re all running frantic to the tomb.

Prince.
What’s this awful thing everyone’s crying about?

Chief Watchman.
Prince, Count Paris was killed and Romeo is dead,
And Juliet; she was dead before,
But now she’s warm and hasn’t been dead for long.

Prince.
Investigate how this terrible murder happened!

Chief Watchman.
Here is the friar, and they were carrying tools-
Tools they could use to open these tombs.

Capulet.
Oh heavens! Oh, look at how our daughter bleeds!
That knife should be stabbed in the Montague’s back,
But instead it’s stuck in my daughter’s breast.

Lady Capulet.
Oh my! This sight of death is like an alarm
That warns me I could die soon.

[Enter Montague and oters.]

Prince.
Come, Montague;
You’re up too early to see your son dead.

Montague.
Oh my! My wife died tonight;
Sadness over my son’s departure stopped her breath.
What more pain must I endure at this old age?

Prince.
Look, and you’ll see.

Montague.
Oh, you bad boy! Where are your manners?
It’s not right for a son to push past his father while he’s dying.

Prince.
Quiet down and stop being mean now,
At least until we can clear this up!
We need to find out what started this,
And how this happened, but in the meantime,
We need to remain patient.
Bring the men of suspicion here now.

Friar Laurence.
I am under the most suspicion,
Because I was here when this awful murder took place.
You can question me and punish me.
I have already condemned and excused myself.

Prince.
Tell us what you know about what happened.

Friar Laurence.
I will be brief because I don’t want to tell a boring story.
Romeo, who lies there dead, was the husband of Juliet.
And she, who lies there dead, was Romeo’s faithful wife.
I married them; their secret wedding day,
Was the day Tybalt died.
His untimely death caused Romeo,
To be banished from the city.
Juliet was sad because Romeo was gone,
Not because of Tybalt’s death.
To cure her sadness,
You arranged a marriage for her with Count Paris.
Then she came to me, and,
She asked me to devise a plan,
To get her out of this second marriage.
She threatened to kill herself in my cell if I didn’t help her.
So I gave her a sleeping potion,
That I had mixed with my special skills.
It worked as planned. She looked dead to everyone.
In the meantime I wrote to Romeo,
And told him to come here,to help take her out of the grave,
When Juliet’s sleeping potion wore off.
But the man who carried my letter, Friar John,
Was held up by an accident. Last night he gave me the letter back.
So I came here alone when she was supposed to wake up and
I was going to take her out of the tomb,
And hide her in my cell until I could make contact with Romeo.
But by the time I got here,
Just a few minutes before Juliet woke up,
Paris and Romeo were already dead. She woke up,
And I asked her to come out of the tomb and go with me,
But then a noise sent me running from the tomb.
She was too depressed to come with me,
And it seems that she killed herself.
I know all of this. And her Nurse knows about the marriage too.
If any part of this tragedy is my fault,
Let my life be sacrificed and let me suffer,
The most severe punishment. Death.

Prince.
We’ve always known you as a holy man but,
Where’s Romeo’s man,
What does Balthasar have to say about this?

Balthasar.
I brought Romeo news of Juliet’s death.
He then he rode from Mantua here to this tomb.
Earlier this morning he asked me to give this letter to his father.
When he went into the vault,
He threatened me with death if I didn’t leave him alone there.

Prince.
Give me the letter, I will look at it.
Here is the count’s page, the one who called the watch?
Boy, what was Romeo doing here?




Page.
He came with flowers to spread on Juliet’s grave.
And he asked me to stand far away,
And leave him alone, so I did.
Then someone with a torch came to open the tomb.
So my master drew on him. And then I ran away to call the watch.

Prince.
This letter confirms the Friar’s claims.
It describes their love, and mentions the news of her death.
Here he writes that he bought poison from a poor pharmacist.
He brought that poison with him to this vault,
To die and lie with Juliet.
Where are these enemies? Capulet! Montague!
Do you see what events resulted from your hate?
Everyone will be punished.

Capulet.
O brother Montague, give me your hand,
This has gone on too long,
For our children have died out of love.

Montague.
But I can give you more.
I’ll make a statue of her in pure gold.
As long as this city is called Verona,
There will be no figure praised more than,
Your true and faithful Juliet.

Capulet.
The statue I will make of Romeo will lie
Beside his Juliet and will be just as rich.
They were wronged sacrifices of our rivalry!

Prince.
We settle a dark peace this morning.
Let’s go, to talk about these sad things some more.
Some will be pardoned, and some will be punished.
There was never a story more full of sadness,
Than that of Romeo and Juliet.

[Exeunt all.]